Rumor or Fact: Can You Bring Home a Tick On Your Christmas Tree?

Author: Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire

Here at Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire, we intend to keep our readers informed all year long about tick bite prevention. While you might be under the impression that ‘tick season’ is past with the fall and winter holidays in sight, think once more. There is no such thing as being too careful in your tick control efforts. And with many New Hampshire families scouring Christmas tree farms and outposts for their yearly tree selection in the coming weeks, we offer a word of caution.

Having a tick on your fresh Christmas tree is not impossible but is unlikely.

Surely a family has dragged home their freshly-felled Christmas tree with a tick or tick eggs on it – somewhere, sometime. Perhaps in warmer climes this is more a possibility than in our cool New Hampshire temperatures in autumn. Ticks will survive cold winter temps here by bedding down beneath leaf and ground litter, fallen pine needles, and sometimes beneath the ground. You are not very likely to find a tick, or her eggs attached to your Christmas tree, but precautionary measures should be taken.

  • If you do find a tick – dispose of it by placing it in rubbing alcohol and/or inside a sealed sandwich bag and dispose of it.

Some pests can inhabit your fresh Christmas tree.

Finding a tick on your favorite Yuletide décor is unlikely, but there could be other unwanted tree-dwellers. Depending on the location of the tree, as well as the type, many different pests could call your home their home. Experts explain there could be as many as 25,000 bugs creeping around one tree! Microscopic tree-dwelling insects will not survive once indoors, as they will starve. Other bugs, which are hibernating will wake up to the warmth of your home thinking its springtime already. If you do not want to endure bugs inside your home this holiday season, here is how you avoid it.

  • Choose your tree wisely – Look at the underside of branches and the trunk close to the ground before choosing your tree. If you see evidence of infestation, such as cocoons, egg masses, or even sawdust, cut off the affected branches or choose another tree.
  • Store before decorating – Do not bring your tree inside as soon as you get home. Allow it to sit in your garage for a few days.
  • Treat the tree – Don’t just store your tree in the garage if you see potential infestations. Treat the tree with neem oil and allow it to sit for a few days before bringing it inside. Do not use aerosols to treat your tree, as they are flammable.
  • Clean up – Once you have treated your tree and left it stored in your garage for a few days, give it a good shake and vacuum up any fallen pests.

Tell ticks to bug off all year long with year-round tick control and prevention from Mosquito Squad of Southern New Hampshire. You can connect with us right here and get a free quote.